Adolescent Services

Olathe & Lawrence, Kansas

Increase thriving by teaching skills that instill competence & confidence while managing symptoms

Difficulties in regulating painful emotions are central to the behavioral difficulties of many adolescents (see Characteristics of Unskilled vs Skilled below). From these individuals’ perspective, painful feelings are most often the “problems to be solved.” These behavioral difficulties might be considered ADHD, anxiety, or depression as many of the symptoms and behaviors overlap and interact. For example, studies have found that having an anxiety disorder in early or middle childhood can increase your child’s risk of developing a depressive disorder in later adolescence.  Both anxiety and depression can lead to dysfunctional behaviors, including suicidal behaviors, substance use, overeating, emotion suppression, overcontrol, and interpersonal mayhem, which are often behavioral solutions to intolerably painful emotions.

The Two Tents Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) utilizes Dialectal Behavioral Therapy - Skills (DBT-S), ACT (Acceptance Commitment Therapy) for Adolescents in the form of DNA-V and exposure therapy.  Our unique blending has become the BOLD Living Skills taught to help your young person and your family  find more effective ways to regulate their emotions and thereby, their behaviors. All three clinical models have decades of evidence in effectively treating anxiety, depression, and the complications of ADHD, shame and guilt. 

IOP Skills training is Monday through Thursday (4x per week) from 2:00-5:00 pm in a group setting usually over 5-6 weeks (~18-24 group sessions).  Family Skills training weekly 3:30-5 pm on Wednesday or Thursday depending on availability.

 DNA-V & What Unskilled Living Looks Like

The purpose of DNA-V is to help develop values and live with vitality.  The discoverer, noticer, and advisor provide the means to engage in valued action, supporting the values that lie at the center of the model.  Values can be thought of as a compass that guides people through the storms and confusing times of life and toward the things they care about.  


The Valuer influences Behavioral Regulation

Developing The Valuer is the process of helping to create contexts that empower young people to clarify what brings them vitality or value and then to choose value consistent actions.


Unskilled Behavioral Regulation looks like:  


Skilled Behavioral Regulation looks like:  


The Advisor influences Cognitive Regulation 

The advisor represents our inner voice. It is an incredible skill that helps us humans navigate the world efficiently. In contrast to the discoverer, the advisor space is about avoiding trial and error. It involves judging, evaluating, generating rules, listening to our self-talk, and problem solving. The advisor can become a problem if we use it blindly, we can lose contact with the physical world and use worry, rumination, our own self-talk or rules even if they do not help us grow. 


Unskilled at Cognitive Regulation looks like:  


Skilled Cognitive Regulation looks like:  


The Noticer influences Emotion Regulation

The Noticer represents a group of behaviors all humans are born with.  Noticing creates the space between internal experiences (feelings and thoughts) and outward behavior, offering an opportunity to choose a behavior rather than “having to” react when difficult feelings and thoughts show up. When we don’t automatically react to our inner experience, we’re often able to better choose actions in the service of what we care about (our values). 


Unskilled at Emotion Regulation looks like:  


Skilled Emotion Regulation looks like:  


The Discoverer influences Self-Regulation/Relationships

The Discoverer finds new ways to be in the world. When people are in discoverer space, they’re behaving in ways that allow them to grow, learn, and expand their behavioral repertoire. Verbal behavior is often tied to the physical actions of testing and exploring.


Unskilled at Self-Regulation & Relationships looks like:


Skilled at Self-Regulation & Relationships looks like:

DBT-S

DBT-S

 Utilizes Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills training

DBT Skills Training groups are for clients who would like to cope more effectively with intense emotions, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. DBT Skills are taught to reduce self-destructive behaviors and learn more adaptive ways to manage painful emotions. 

These skills include:

DNA-V

DNA-V is an evidence-based model that promotes psychological strength, and that values consistent living, vitality, and success. It is designed to help people cope with challenges, stress, and change. DNA-V can be thought of as a combination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and positive psychology, and is underpinned by contextual behavioural science.

Thriving Adolescent Website

Parents 

Requried Involvement

The goal of Family Skills Group is to build strong and effective partnerships with families that can help children and families thrive. These partnerships are grounded in positive, ongoing, and goal-oriented relationships with families.

Insurance

The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (group therapy) is either in-network or we can usually get authorization (coverage) from these companies. We are not a covered service and cannot get coverage from KanCare (including Aetna KanCare), Medicaid or Medicare. For those families, we do offer a self-pay rate, scholarships and payment plan options. At the assessment we will provide you a written review of your insurance benefits and out-of-pocket costs, if possible.

12-18 Year-Old Group

Weekly Family Skills Group

Thursdays 

3:30-5:00 pm

BOLD is a process for making Wise Mind decisions.  Utilizing experiential learning, in-group practice, artful expression and daily goal setting we hope to support young people confront their defense mechanisms, cope with negative thinking; notice, understand and express their emotions while discovering new ways to interact with the world toward what matters to them.  

That is the essence of BOLD Living.

What BOLD Living Looks Like

We hope that a young person completing the TWO TENTS IOP  is displaying many and continuing to move toward all 20 of these Signs of BOLD Living.


The TWO TENTS TEAM

Clinical Director Bio

I’m a GenX, postmodern, question everything person who happens to be blessed with parents who took in orphans, prayed for food, answered their callings and sacrificed so their children knew they were loved.  That mix created an irreverent soul that cares deeply for children, families and especially adolescents.

I have close to thirty years of experience working with and for children, youth and families catalyzing change at the individual, family, organizational and systems levels.  With a Masters in clinical psychology, I have provided crisis management, intensive in-home therapy and wrap-around services for children with emotional and behavioral challenges.  I have 20+ years’ working or volunteering with youth and young adults through youth ministry and community programs. In partnership with North Kansas City Hospital co-created the Quarky app to connect Kansas City 14-24-year-olds to articles, events and resources focused on mental health and well-being.  Currently, I developed and direct the Two Tents Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for adolescents struggling with anxiety/depression.  We are building strong partnerships with our area school districts and I am an invited speaker on Anxiety, Depression, Grit, SEL and Parenting. These opportunities have made me innovative, practical and taught me to think about enhancing the whole safety net surrounding at-risk children, youth and families.

I have a wonderful wife, Kori, who founded and runs the Renew Counseling Center in Olathe, a 12-year-old, Nora, twin boys (Grayson who is seven and Jude who went to heaven way too early) and have recently adopted  two foster siblings (8 & 5) Chandler and Milla into our home. 

I want to be a resource to the families that are currently in or have completed our program and don't take on individual clients. 

Jason is willing to Present, Consult, Train or just be a Resource for Parents, Schools, Churches and Teens.

Clinical Team:  All have their own private practices and see individuals and/or families.  Contact them directly, if interested.

Katie Frits

Associate Director, Olathe Intake Specialist & Olathe Clinician

katie@anxietycenterkc.com 

Full Profile

IOP Team

Kelsi Grove, LCPC

Olathe Group Clinician

kelsi@grovecounselingllc.com 

(913) 735-4002 

Full Profile

Jason Stary, LCPC

Olathe Group Clinician

jstary@lifelinecounselingcenter.org 

(913) 764-5463 ext. 103 

Full Profile

Joe Segraves, MA, LPC

Lawrence Site Director | Clinician

jpsegraves.renew@gmail.com  

(913) 768-6606

Full Profile  

Administrative Team:  

Paperwork, Finances and Community Engagement make the work possible.

Kelly Northup

Adolescent Program Administrator

kellynorthup.renew@gmail.com

(913) 768-6606 ext. 314

Stacy Pruett

Office Administrator

stacyprenew@gmail.com

(913) 768-6606 ext. 301

Clara Duong

Operations Manager

cduong.renew@gmail.com 

(913) 768-6606

Melissa Umscheid

Outreach Manager

mumscheid.renew@gmail.com

(913) 210-1017


Why Two Tents?

You have options for adolescent intensive treatment:  Some more conveniently located; some that  meet at more convenient times; some that are connected to larger institutions.  Below are some reasons families choose to join our program. 

Helping Adolescents with Anxiety (Short Clips)

Topics 

Be on the Journey Together I They Can't do this on their Own I Educate Yourself First I Using Mindful Action I Recognizing Anxiety I Anxiety is Bigger than "Mean" Thoughts I Creating a Thrive Filter for your Young Person I You're going to have to Parent Differently

Designed to Enhance & Partner (not compete) with:

Many Adolescents are Struggling

The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement NCS-A is a nationally representative face-to-face survey of 10,123 adolescents aged 13–18 years in the continental U.S. DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using a modified version of the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

Results

Anxiety disorders were the most common condition (31.9%), followed by behavior disorders (19.1%), mood disorders (14.3%), and self-medication disorders (11.4%), with approximately 40% of those with one class of disorder also meeting criteria for another class of lifetime disorder. The overall prevalence of disorders with severe impairment and/or distress was 22.2%; (11.2% with mood disorders; 8.3% with anxiety disorders; 9.6% behavior disorders). The median age of onset for disorder classes was earliest for anxiety (6 years), followed by 11 years for behavior, 13 years for mood, and 15 years for self-medication disorders.

Conclusions

These findings provide the first prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents. Approximately one in every 4–5 youth in the U.S. meets criteria for a mental disorder with severe impairment across their lifetime. The likelihood that common mental disorders in adults first emerge in childhood and adolescence highlights the need for a transition from the common focus on treatment of U.S. youth to that of prevention and early intervention.

Many Adolescents are Struggling

The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement NCS-A is a nationally representative face-to-face survey of 10,123 adolescents aged 13–18 years in the continental U.S. DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using a modified version of the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

Results

Anxiety disorders were the most common condition (31.9%), followed by behavior disorders (19.1%), mood disorders (14.3%), and self-medication disorders (11.4%), with approximately 40% of those with one class of disorder also meeting criteria for another class of lifetime disorder. The overall prevalence of disorders with severe impairment and/or distress was 22.2%; (11.2% with mood disorders; 8.3% with anxiety disorders; 9.6% behavior disorders). The median age of onset for disorder classes was earliest for anxiety (6 years), followed by 11 years for behavior, 13 years for mood, and 15 years for self-medication disorders.

Conclusions

These findings provide the first prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents. Approximately one in every 4–5 youth in the U.S. meets criteria for a mental disorder with severe impairment across their lifetime. The likelihood that common mental disorders in adults first emerge in childhood and adolescence highlights the need for a transition from the common focus on treatment of U.S. youth to that of prevention and early intervention.

TWO TENTS IOP AfterCare

The intensive program is a great opportunity to learn a lot of skills and decide on what big changes need to be made individually and as a family to move for more effectively.  Sustaining change is hard.  

AfterCare reinforces the skills taught, has been shown to decrease relapse and supports the climb up their Growth Ladders.  Parent Support Group helps parents do the same.

Weekly AfterCare Every Wednesday

 8575 W. 110th St., Suite 320, Overland Park, KS 66210

5:30 to 6:50 pm

Click here for more information and AfterCare schedule.

Two Tents Program & materials